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“Run, jump, have all the fun you want at the right time, but, for heaven’s sake, do not commit sin!”
Don Bosco

National Day of Sorrow and Promise

Sorrow and Promise

Together with all Catholic religious across Australia, we the Salesians recognise pain and sufferings of survivors and secondary victims of institutional child abuse, and we pledge a commitment for a much better future. We promise a safe way forward for all, especially the young and vulnerable adults in our care.

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Greetings for the Feast of Don Bosco 2019

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Fr Ángel Fernández Artime SDB, Rector Major

Greetings from Fr Ángel Fernández Artime the Rector Major of the Salesians of Don Bosco to all Young People around the world on the accasion of the Feast of St John Bosco, January 31st, 2019.



Province Highlights

  • The LinksSalesian News

    The Links



    The Links is the News Service of the Salesians of Don Bosco for the Australian-Pacific Province. It serves to connect the Salesians to the world, and the world to the Salesians.

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    Book of the week


    By The Grace of God

    By Fr Tom Uzhunnalil SDB
    Recounting 557 days of terrorist captivity in war-torn Yemen
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  • Pacific Beats NewsletterPacific

    Pacific Beats Newsletter


    Pacifis Beats is the Salesian Newsletter from the Pacific: Samoa, Fiji and New Zealand.

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A future worth building includes everyone

Why the only future worth building includes everyone

Pope Francis

His Holiness Pope Francis

Taken from a speech....

To Christians, the future does have a name, and its name is Hope. Feeling hopeful does not mean to be optimistically naïve and ignore the tragedy humanity is facing. Hope is the virtue of a heart that doesn't lock itself into darkness, that doesn't dwell on the past, does not simply get by in the present, but is able to see a tomorrow.

Feeling hopeful does not mean to be optimistically naïve and ignore the tragedy humanity is facing. Hope is the virtue of a heart that doesn't lock itself into darkness, that doesn't dwell on the past, does not simply get by in the present, but is able to see a tomorrow. Hope is the door that opens onto the future. Hope is a humble, hidden seed of life that, with time, will develop into a large tree. It is like some invisible yeast that allows the whole dough to grow, that brings flavour to all aspects of life. And it can do so much, because a tiny flicker of light that feeds on hope is enough to shatter the shield of darkness. A single individual is enough for hope to exist, and that individual can be you. And then there will be another "you," and another "you," and it turns into an "us." And so, does hope begin when we have an "us?" No. Hope began with one "you." When there is an "us," there begins a revolution: the revolution of tenderness. And what is tenderness? It is a movement that starts from our heart and reaches the eyes, the ears and the hands. Tenderness means to use our eyes to see the other, our ears to hear the other, to listen to the children, the poor, those who are afraid of the future. To listen also to the silent cry of our common home, of our sick and polluted earth. Tenderness means to use our hands and our heart to comfort the other, to take care of those in need.

Tenderness is the language of the young children, of those who need the other. A child’s love for mom and dad grows through their touch, their gaze, their voice, their tenderness. I like when I hear parents talk to their babies, adapting to the little child, sharing the same level of communication. This is tenderness: being on the same level as the other. God himself descended into Jesus to be on our level. This is the same path the Good Samaritan took. This is the path that Jesus himself took. He lowered himself, he lived his entire human existence practising the real, concrete language of love.

Yes, tenderness is the path of choice for the strongest, most courageous men and women. Tenderness is not weakness; it is fortitude. It is the path of solidarity, the path of humility. Please, allow me to say it loud and clear: the more powerful you are, the more your actions will have an impact on people, the more responsible you are to act humbly. If you don’t, your power will ruin you, and you will ruin the other. There is a saying in Argentina: "Power is like drinking gin on an empty stomach." You feel dizzy, you get drunk, you lose your balance, and you will end up hurting yourself and those around you, if you don’t connect your power with humility and tenderness. Through humility and concrete love, on the other hand, power – the highest, the strongest one – becomes a service, a force for good.



Salesian Bulletin Logo Republished from the Australian Salesian Bulletin - Spring 2017
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